Your search returned over 400 essays for "my favorite memory"


The study of public memory has grown rapidly across numerous disciplines in recent years, among them American studies, history, philosophy, sociology, architecture, and communications. As scholars probe acts of collective remembrance, they have shed light on the cultural processes of memory. Essays contained in this volume address issues such as the scope of public memory, the ways we forget, the relationship between politics and memory, and the material practices of memory.

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Memory is one of the important cognitive processes. Memory involves remembering and forgetting.
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Your search returned over 400 essays for "earliest memories"

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About the Book
In recent years digital technology has made available an inconceivably vast archive of old media. Images of the past—accessed with the touch of a finger—are now intertwined with those of the present, raising questions about how visual culture affects our relationship with history and memory.

This collection of new essays contributes to a growing debate about how the past and its media are appropriated in the modern world. Focusing on a range of visual cultures, the essays explore the intersection of film, television, online and print media and visual art—platforms whose boundaries are increasingly hard to define—and the various ways we engage the past in an environment saturated with the imagery of previous eras. Topics include period screen fiction, nonfiction media histories and memories, cinematic nostalgia and recycling, and the media as both purveyors and carriers of memory. About the Author(s)
Jilly Boyce Kay is currently a Research Associate in the Department of Media and Communication at the University of Leicester, United Kingdom. Her work has been published in journals such as , as well as in a number of edited collections on media history, gender and television. Cat Mahoney’s work has been published in and she has presented at Television for Women: an International Conference, the Social History Society Annual Conference, and at the Cinema e Storia conference. She lives in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK. Caitlin Shaw’s work appears in Cinema, Television and History: New Approaches. She lives in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, United Kingdom.

Your search returned over 400 essays for "long-term memory"

"This superb collection of papers inaugurates a new direction in the study of kinship and politics grounded in the complexities of memory. Carsten and her colleagues link everyday processes of relating with larger webs of power and authority through the ghosts - those whose existence is contested - they have in common. Thus they show that the sociality of remembering and forgetting lies above all in the creation and destruction of persons."

Your search returned over 400 essays for "memories"
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Your search returned over 400 essays for "short term memory"

Generally, it helps to keep the essay focused on one to three important memories about that person. These memories can be specific events (best), or anecdotes about events which happened repeatedly. Characteristics of this sort of essay:

Your search returned over 400 essays for "childhood memory"

5. Memories of Movement and the Stillness of Place: KinshipMemory in the Polish Highlands: Frances Pine (Goldsmiths College,University of London).

Your search returned over 400 essays for "my favorite memory"

"This superb collection of papers inaugurates a new direction in the study of kinship and politics grounded in the complexities of memory. Carsten and her colleagues link everyday processes of relating with larger webs of power and authority through the ghosts - those whose existence is contested - they have in common. Thus they show that the sociality of remembering and forgetting lies above all in the creation and destruction of persons."